Berklee Blogs

First-hand accounts of the Berklee experience

Boston Conservatory at Berklee

Boston Conservatory at Berklee

Friday Night Classical ft. Berklee Indian Ensemble

September 27th. 8:00pm. Boston Conservatory at Berklee. You had to be there to experience the music in all its glory. The sold-out performance aptly titled “Which Classical Music?” was directed by Markus Placci and was a celebration of chamber music, performed by acclaimed Boston Conservatory at Berklee faculty members and renowned guest artists from around the world. 

The term “classical music” has far deeper global connotations than what a google search for the term might suggest and it was there for the audience to see in a night filled with dazzling performances, including our very own Berklee Indian Ensemble. Markus Placci came up with the idea while he was visiting India and realized that his idea of Classical Music was vastly different from the people around him. It dawned on him that every part of the world has their own idea of classical music which isn’t restricted to the purely western idea of it. He goes on to say “My hope with the program was to show that there is such a history in the development of any music anywhere in the world, that for any of them, there is a “classical” portion of that development.”

What made it even more special was that it was a first for Carnatic music to be performed at the Boston Conservatory. For those of you who might not be familiar with Carnatic music, it’s a form of Indian Classical Music originating from South India with the main emphasis being on melodic soloists. Let’s not forget that Carnatic music is only half of what Indian Classical music has to offer and the hope is to cover Hindustani music which comes from North India in a future series. 

The goal, as suggested by two veteran Indian Ensemble students, Shradha Ganesh and Ganesh Balasubramanian, who performed Raju Vedale and Idhudhaano Thillai Sthalam respectively, was to “inform the audience of something new, to understand the musicality of the pieces performed and to see how the audience will react.” 

As Mr. Placci eloquently put it, “I believe that music is such a primordial and essential need for human beings, that I wanted to emphasize its inevitable presence and history alongside the development of human beings anywhere in the world.” Judging from the audience’s response, it is safe to say that they achieved what they set out to do, and then some!

by Prithvi Prajosh

Six Students Reflect on Their Spring Break Visits to Music Industry Cities

Over spring break, Berklee students attended industry trips to L.A., Nashville, New York City, and Atlanta. Here, five students from various trips share their experiences with Berklee Blogs.

Claire Marie LimClaire Marie Lim | Atlanta

“As aptly put by one of the professionals we encountered, ‘Elsewhere, people try to cut your strings; in Atlanta, people give you ropes.’ The sense of community that we felt from Atlanta’s music scene was impossible to deny.”

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In Memoriam: Robert Honeysucker

Dear members of the Boston Conservatory at Berklee and Berklee College of Music community,

We recently learned that longtime Conservatory faculty member Robert (Bob) Honeysucker unexpectedly passed away over the weekend at the age of 74. This news has left us with heavy hearts as we mourn the passing of a dear colleague, teacher, and friend.

Bob joined the Boston Conservatory voice faculty in 1981, and also served on the faculty of Longy School of Music. He was an active performer of opera, oratorio, and concert music, and gave recitals all over the world, including Japan, where he frequently performed with his wife, pianist Noriko Yasuda. He was a member of Videmus, as well as the cofounder of the Jubilee Trio, a group that presents rarely performed American art songs by African American composers.

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Behind the scenes of the music video for the song "Yo Soy Inmigrante"

Chronicling the Trials and Triumphs of the Immigrant Experience

In spring 2016, Bolivian student Luis Gamarra wrote and recorded the song “Yo Soy Inmigrante” to help change the tone of the national discourse surrounding immigration. Here, Gamarra shares his thoughts on the experience.

Behind the scenes of the music video for the song "Yo Soy Inmigrante"By Luis Gamarra

I am extremely lucky and blessed to be in this country as an immigrant. I arrived to the United States after winning a residency lottery offered by the U.S government. Only a few thousand families in the whole world get to have this opportunity. I decided to leave my family, my country and friends for the chance of making all the big ideas and goals in my head come true. Being 18 years old in a brand new country and having to work at 3 different jobs to pay for your bills is definitely not easy, but I knew a great opportunity would come if I kept working very hard.

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